See more news

Commission for mass mobilization leader receives religious deputies

Typical Buddhist groups, individuals praised for contributions to Buddhist culture in Quang Binh

PM receives standing members of Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Vietnam

Buddhists praised for contribution in public security protection

Program honoring Mother Goddess worship, ancient village festivals held in Phu Tho

10/25/2019 04:18
Afghan Museum Repairs Buddhist Art, One Broken Piece at a Time
Bamyan Buddha

Experts trying to restore Afghanistan’s Buddhist treasures say it is like working on a 1,500-year-old puzzle.

In 2001, the Taliban destroyed Buddhist artifacts, many of which were one thousand years old or more. The artifacts include two huge statues of Buddha in Bamyan province. Many smaller artifacts found at Buddhist religious centers and kept in the national museum of Kabul also faced destruction.

After the Taliban government fell in 2001, the museum began repairing the artifacts from the country’s Buddhist history. The U.S.-supported project will try to reassemble thousands of pieces into statues within the next three years.

“It is very important (work) because it is actually restoration of our…identity, our past,” said Mohammad Fahim Rahimi. He is the director of the 100-year-old National Museum of Afghanistan.

“Buddhism was…here for more than 1,000 years. That’s a very large part of our history,” he added.

But since the Soviet invasion of the 1980s, Afghanistan has had nearly 40 years of war and much of the country’s art, artifacts and architecture has been destroyed.

Militias stole other pieces and sold them to international collectors illegally.

Sixty-two-year-old conservator Sherazuddin Saifi was working in the museum under the Taliban in 2001.

“They wanted us to tell them the number of antiquities and we ignored their request, but some days later they came and started breaking the antiquities,” said Saifi. He still works at the museum.

“These antiquities are the national treasure and the history of our country and show who lived in this country,” he added.

In a classroom at the museum, Afghan conservators work alongside experts from the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute. U.S. assistance is important because Afghan conservators lack experience. They also lack the necessary chemicals and equipment needed for restoration work, Rahimi said.

Sometimes they can work from old photos that show the statues as they were before the destruction. In other cases, 3-D imaging and imagination are required to reassemble pieces of Buddha faces, hands and torsos.

A spokesman for the Taliban said the group has no plans to destroy national treasures in the future.

“All antique artifacts will be (kept) in their place,” spokesman Suhail Shaheen told Reuters. “They should be (kept) for the history and culture education of the upcoming generations.”

The possibility of bringing the Taliban in a power-sharing deal troubles Rahimi. He is looking at ways to move the artifacts if they are threatened again.

“We cannot let that happen again to our heritage,” he said.

Source: learningenglish.voanews.com

Afghan Museum Repairs Buddhist Art, One Broken Piece at a TimeIn 2001, the Taliban destroyed Buddhist artifacts, many of which were one thousand years old or more. The artifacts include two huge statues of Buddha in Bamyan province. Many smaller artifacts found at Buddhist religious centers and kept in the national museum
Share on Facebook   Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Buzz        Back   Send   Print   Top of page
More news
India, Pakistan to sign agreement on Kartarpur corridor on Thursday: MEA -10/24/2019 04:45
French bishops plan to open plenary meetings to lay participation -10/22/2019 05:15
Pope’s Message for World Food Day: Wasting the bread of the poor -10/21/2019 05:13
Nearly 1 billion euros raised, pledged for Notre-Dame cathedral rebuild -10/21/2019 05:09
Nigeria: Police rescue chained students from another Islamic school -10/17/2019 05:14
India’s court ends hearings in Hindu-Muslim temple dispute -10/17/2019 05:12
India tightens security ahead of Ayodhya ruling -10/16/2019 05:07
Pope Francis canonizes five new saints -10/16/2019 04:59
Religious harmony prevails in Kingdom -10/15/2019 05:45
UN chief condemns deadly Burkina Faso mosque attack -10/15/2019 05:05
Address: Yen Hoa Ward - Cau Giay District, Ha Noi - Viet Nam
Telephone: +84243 8 248 763. Fax: 08041313
Email: ttttbantongiao@chinhphu.vn